Sightseeing In Indianapolis

Capitol Building is a omnipresent in the Indianapolis skyline
Capitol Building is a omnipresent in the Indianapolis skyline

During the days, I have some free time to enjoy sightseeing and exploring in Indianapolis.    Thursday was very rainy in the morning but I went out for a walk/run and found the Cultural Trail through downtown. No pictures but this run laid the groundwork for the rest of my sightseeing.

Here is a link to a downtown map that will really help with how close everything is – including the Cultural Trail and the White River State Park.  Our hotel is the Embassy Suites and is shown in BLUE and the Convention Center is prominently displayed in RED

The Capitol Building is the closest landmark to our downtown hotel.

Capitol Building
Capitol Building

 Thursday I jogged through the Indiana University campus.  Friday I went into the White River State Park and jogged along the White River.   What a great running and biking area and so accessible to downtown Indianapolis!

Cultural Trail and View of Downtown Indy
Cultural Trail and View of Downtown Indy

I walk/ran about 3.5 miles out from my hotel before turning around at 10th Street bridge.    The running/bike path continues on well past my turnaround point.

White River
White River
White River State Park
White River State Park

Along the way, I encountered a flock of ducks – at least a hundred of them.  They were on the banks and in my running path.  As I ran through them, they got quite aggressive and were hissing at me.  On the way back, I had to take these pictures.

White River Banks - Ducks hissing at me!
White River Banks – Ducks hissing at me!
Ducks dominate 1/4 mile stretch of White River
Ducks dominate 1/4 mile stretch of White River

On Saturday,  I debated about going to the Zoo – which is right next to the White River.   When I got there, the zoo was quite busy as it is a long weekend and the weather is gorgeous.   I decided to skip the Zoo and head directly to the NCAA Hall of Champions.

Outside of the NCAA Hall of Champions
Outside of the NCAA Hall of Champions

The admission fee was $5.  I was both delighted and upset that the young man did not give me the senior rate of $3: the cheap part of me wanted the discount but the vain part of me did not want to be thought of as a senior.

The entrance was quite grand with a bronze set of statues of football players.

The Wedge Sculpture - Entrance to the NCAA Hall of Champions
The Wedge Sculpture – Entrance to the NCAA Hall of Champions

All-in-all, the Hall was bit of a disappointment.  The NCAA attempted to be inclusive in terms of race, sex, sports, schools, levels and decades.  The facility is not that large so they singled out one athlete or one event in each sport and profiled that person or event.  The only compelling exhibit for me was the one on the history of women’s participation in NCAA sports.  Most of the changes have occurred in my lifetime and I was unaware of how big the changes were.

Upstairs the Hall has interactive exhibits – such as one entitled:  “You Make the Call”.   It was broken – I never figured out if I was right or wrong.    For the record, I decided the person was safe.  For tennis, they had a Plexiglas pane setup and fired tennis balls at you at 80 mph so that you can appreciate the speed of the serves.  That was interesting.

White River - heading toward Lucas Oil Stadium
White River – heading toward Lucas Oil Stadium

From there, I decided to walk along the White River in the opposite direction as I had run the day before.  It was a beautiful morning:  I was really enjoying the weather and the walk.

The Biking and Hiking trail system is quite extensive – here is a sign indicating that I was at the 19 mile mark.   In the tree days I was there, I covered about 5 miles of the trail.  In most places, there is a “high trail” area that is where most folks are.  In some places, there is also a “river side” trail – which goes under the crossing bridges.  This picture shows both of trails.

Mile Marker for Hiking and Biking Trail
Mile Marker for Hiking and Biking Trail

Further along,  I came across some fast-moving waters (rapids?) and some folks fishing.  In this area of the trail, there were very few people on the trail.

White water on the White River
White water on the White River
Fishing on the White River
Fishing on the White River

And one final view of downtown from the hiking trail.  There is a historical placard under one of the bridges about how these bridges were engineered and built by local citizens using local sand and white pine.   Most of the bridges that span the river are the same design and construction.

Indianapolis Skyline
Indianapolis Skyline

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